Angiokeratomas are benign skin lesions

This is not the same as Fordyce spots, which are small red or white bumps that appear on the member or sacks. Instead, angiokeratomas often resemble warts (although they are distinct from warts), appearing as reddish or blackish raised bumps that can range in size from 1mm to 6 mm or more. The surface of the larger ones is usually �pebbly,� and they are hard, not compressing when touched.

Often angiokeratomas may present as a series of small �dots� on the manhood and/or sacks. Often, however, they cluster, especially when they are larger, creating a rash-like appearance. Because of their resemblance to warts in these cluster formations, they can be very off-putting to potential partners.

What causes them?

So how does a guy get angiokeratomas? In some instances, they may be a result of a condition known as Fabry’s disease. This is a rare genetic disorder which can cause significant pain, kidney dysfunction, cardiac complications, ringing in the ears, fatigue and vertigo.

However, as stated, Fabry’s disease is rare; far more often, angiokeratomas form when a blood vessel develops a clot. This causes the vessel to grow and move closer to the surface of the skin. Over time, skin cells may then form over the blood vessel, creating the lesions.

Angiokeratomas can occur at any time; however, those located in the member or sacks are more often associated with men over the age of 50.

Although typically benign, there can be some health issues associated with the condition. For example, friction from sensual activity (whether with a partner or alone) may cause rupture and bleeding. In some cases, there may be low levels of pain associated with them. More rarely, angiokeratomas may create an environment in which bacterial or fungal infections can thrive.

Treatment

Since angiokeratomas are usually a benign member rash, they do not require treatment. However, if they are encouraging infections, a doctor may surgically remove them. Removal is generally a simple procedure involving lasers or cryotherapy (freezing them off). Often angiokeratomas are mistaken for melanoma and may be excised for that reason.

Angiokeratomas are an unusual cause of member rash; more often, dermatological issues are likely to create a rash situation. In such instances, regular use of a top drawer male organ health crme (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin) can be beneficial. Rashes often result at least partially due to dry skin, so using a crme that includes a combination of potent moisturizing agents (such as vitamin E and Shea butter) can help keep male organ skin well hydrated. In addition, the skin will be stronger if it is not prone to oxidative stress; using a crme with an effective antioxidant, such as alpha lipoic acid, can help reduce the likelihood of oxidative stress damage.